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Shorefront Journal
Uncovering stories is a part of Shorefront’s DNA

Shorefront Journal

Shorefront Journal is the official online publication of Shorefront. Occasional postings explore local Black history, work within Shorefront and welcomes contributing articles from the general public. The original journal began in 1999 as a printed quarterly. In 2012, the journal transitioned online with an annual printed version. Several issues of the original journal can be found at issuu.com/shorefront.

For submissions: Send articles and supporting images for consideration to shorefront@me.com

Re-posting: Please cite “shorefrontlegacy.org” when reposting any Shorefront media and publications originating from Shorefront Journal

Publications: Visit lulu.com/spotlight/shorefrontpress for all of Shorefront’s active publications through Shorefront Press.

In 1999, Shorefront Journal, in its original printed form, was released to meet the need of sharing these significant stories to the general public. Published quarterly, this informal journal gave voice to the many historical moments throughout the Northern suburbs of Chicago.

The journal also gave exposure to more than 60 contributing writers — students, professors, historians alike — and became a venue for writers to share their stories and skills.

Shorefront welcomes the work of novice and professional writers and will make every effort to assure timely consideration of submissions. CLICK HERE to submit.

Reflections on Shorefront

— By Katherine D’Antico I was fortunate enough to discover Shorefront through a recommendation from Dominican University professor. The professor thought Shorefront would be a good candidate for my practicum since it was in my hometown, Evanston, IL. I did not realize this archival repository was within walking distance down Ridge Ave. I was unsure ...

Shorefront Update #010

Shorefront’s 2017 year was filled with activities, avocation, national forums and new partnerships. New acquisitions, the 5th installment of the Black History Month Lecture Series, participation with institutions from around the country and engagement with the schools have increased Shorefronts visibility and discoverability. As an active collecting repository, new items added to the archives come ...

William H. Gill: Publisher, Businessman, Churchman, Public Servant

—by Rhonda K. Craven By the early 1900s, Evanston’s black community was well established, with three growing churches, a variety of individuals owning their own businesses, children attending the local schools, families owning and living in homes in different neighborhoods, and thriving social organizations. Some original settlers, dating as early as 1855, had already passed ...

The Nile Club—The Social Evolution of a Black Veritas

— By Spencer Jourdain . . . Throughout his college years, Edwin B. Jourdain Jr. (Gint) enjoyed engaging in every aspect of university life available to a black student. He loved to attend the university orchestra and glee club concerts, carefully storing away the events’ ticket stubs, and was a big fan of the football ...

Beauty, Jazz and Dreams: Kathryn Wimp’s Musical Journey With Duke Ellington

— By Carrie Moea Brown As Kathryn “Kay” MacDonald finished up the last two songs in her performance in Chicago, her eyes fixed toward the back of the auditorium. In walked a man surrounded by what in modern terms is referred to as an entourage. The year was 1944, and within moments she recognized what ...

Returning Home: The Centennial of the Abbeville Lynching of Anthony Crawford

—By Doria Johnson In January of 2008, First Lady Laura Bush designated Abbeville a “Preserve America Community.” This initiative recognizes those communities that demonstrate a commitment to preserving their cultural and natural heritage. After years of denying the African American experience, Abbeville took one bold step towards that identity. With seven weeks notice, the community ...
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